Category: Restoration work

Of tamarind and tolerance

Of tamarind and tolerance

An edited and shorter version of this article appeared in The Hindu Sunday Magazine on 17 June 2012.

For centuries, long rows of grand tamarind trees have marked our roadsides, particularly in southern India. The wide, old roads radiating from Coimbatore city, in particular, had long rows of grand tamarind trees on either side. One could see them on the road to Mettupalayam and the hazy blue mountains beyond, on the road to the sacred hill of Marudhamalai, towards the Sathyamangalam hills and Mysore to the north, through the expansive plateau and plains to Salem, and southwards past Pollachi to the ancient hills of the elephants, the Anamalai.

A highway flanked by tamarind trees, with people collecting fruits in bags, near Anamalai in Coimbatore District (Photo: P Jeganathan)
A highway flanked by tamarind trees, with people collecting fruits in bags, near Anamalai in Coimbatore District (Photo: P. Jeganathan)

The trees have stood like old sentinels, serene and solid through the rush of years. Their sturdy trunks and strong branches have towered over and across the roads, quite unmindful of buffeting rain and searing sun. Their twigs, festooned with dark green leaves, each with its paired row of little leaflets, have provided an impartial and unstinting shade and shelter for all. In return, the trees seemed only to need a little space by the side of road, to set their roots in, and a space to stretch their arms.

They stood like this until the men came with the axes and saws for the slaughter of the trees. The men brought heavy bulldozers and earth movers—construction equipment powered for destruction—to gouge the ancient roots of the tamarind trees out of the earth. Trees that had stood for centuries were brusquely despatched in a matter of hours.

Tamarind trees hacked away on the Mettupalayam Road (Photo: T. R. Shankar Raman)
Tamarind trees hacked away on the Mettupalayam Road (Photo: T. R. Shankar Raman)

The tamarind tree is an old and dignified citizen of our city avenues and gardens, our countryside and farms. Its name, derived from the Arabic tamar-ul-Hind or the ‘the date of India’, finds mention in written historical accounts of India going back centuries. There is irony in this, for the tamarind is native to Africa and not a species that grows naturally in India’s forests. Despite being alien to India, the tamarind has not run wild and become an invasive pest, becoming instead what biologists call a naturalised species. Embraced by a deep tolerance and cultural acceptance into Indian cuisine and culture, the tamarind is today a familiar and inseparable part of Indian life and landscape.

A wild tamarind tree near Laka Manyara in Tanzania, East Africa (Photo: Divya Mudappa)
A wild tamarind tree near Laka Manyara in Tanzania, East Africa (Photo: Divya Mudappa)

Abiding benefits

Before the men and the machines came, the tamarind trees seemed to have an abiding presence, like torch-bearers marking a productive countryside, like the enduring blue mountains in the distance. Their wide trunks rose above stout roots that pushed into the soil, like muscled and flexed thighs gripping the earth. Their fissured bark was thick and brown, aged and toughened and weathered, like the wrinkled face of the old woman selling mangoes in the patch of shade below.

Under the dense canopy, thousands of pedestrians and riders of two-wheelers found quick shelter from rain. Or, in scorching summers, a refreshing coolness cast by the tiny leaflets—how many leaflets does a tamarind tree have, a million, ten million? Even the air-conditioners seemed to waft easier and cooler in the metal cocoons of parked cars that escaped roasting in the sun. The trees seemed to abide, they granted benefits, and their beneficence was taken for granted.

Every year, the twigs were weighed down with hundreds of lumpy brown pods, with skins like coarse felt covering pulp, tart and tasty, and disc-like, shining seeds. The fruits were there for the taking. The adept and nimble climbed the branches to knock down the fruit. Their friends darted around to grab the fallen pods, dodging traffic.

Tamarind fruits collected from the roadside trees (Photo: P. Jeganathan)
Tamarind fruits collected from the roadside trees (Photo: P. Jeganathan)

On the roads, many tamarind trees had managed to rise above anonymity: each tree, even if not named, was numbered; each individual claimed by negotiation or auction by someone from the village or panchayat for its fruit. Collected, dried, and packed, the fruit of the tamarind trees would eventually find its way into a thousand dishes, enrich the palate of millions, and become inseparably incorporated in people’s cuisine, in their lives, in their very bodies. And no one could stop the children, who needed only a handful of stones to claim their share. The trees brought utility, food, cash, plain fun.

Tamarind fruits, seeds, and leaves are used for food and flavour, juice and snacks. Tamarind is now an inseparable part of Indian cuisine (Photo: Kalyan Varma)
Tamarind fruits, seeds, and leaves are used for food and flavour, juice and snacks. Tamarind is now an inseparable part of Indian cuisine (Photo: Kalyan Varma)

And yet, there is more to the tamarind. Beyond the utility and the benefits of the trees, there is something intangible, amiss, overlooked. It seems to emerge as a touch of beauty—an enlivening green in an increasingly dour landscape. A beauty fragile forever from the prospect of loss just a chain-saw away. It seems to emanate from the trees, too, from the sounds where a few still remain. The soughing of wind through ten million leaflets, in mournful restlessness, carrying the delicate aroma of the tamarind’s modest, finely-marked flowers. The creak of branches and the click of twigs holding the tamarind’s pendant fruit. Or, when the wind abates, a calming susurrus pierced only by the occasional screech of parakeets. And when dusk descends, the tamarind trees darken to the chuckle of mynas, the chatter of shy owlets, and the hoots of somnolent owls, rising with the stars. The trees are silent but full of sounds, and one who hears them may find things worth listening to.

Roadside aesthetic: a misty morning with tamarind trees along a road in Tamil Nadu (Photo: P. Jeganathan)
Roadside aesthetic: a misty morning with tamarind trees along a road in Tamil Nadu (Photo: P. Jeganathan)

Reading the landscape

Naturalists and ecologists, who spend a fair bit of their time watching the earth and its creatures, sometimes say that you can read a landscape, you can see its wounds and sense a need for healing. On the Mettupalayam road and onto the hills beyond, sure, you cannot miss reading the landscape: somebody has spelt it out in big letters for you. “Vote for ——— Party”, says one sign, painted with a crudely-daubed logo, rather unwittingly symbolic in its background of whitewash. “Faith in God”, says another, pointing to a higher authority. “Enjoy the Serene Villas”, declares a sign for a resort promising a better place, not above, but ahead. A painted board of the Forest Department, placed in front of a patch of forest that has existed for millennia, asserts: “Preservation Plot: This Forest has been Protected as it was for Decades”. And a wit, who has perhaps had a bumpy ride, has painted on: “And so has this road.”

The wounds are there, too. There are the cuts and gouges in the land, festering moistly with garbage and hyacinth. One wishes the waters would not find their way into these old tanks and streams to turn dry dumps of civilisation’s discards into suppurating sores. There are the stumps of surgery: trunks and branches neatly sliced to make way for better things like wires and cables. The rot sets in, hollowing into the stumps, but only to make homes for families of owls or mynas. There are the thorns in the side of the stumps and trees that remain: nails hammered in the hundreds, carrying rusty boards and advertisements and nameplates, or garlands of wilted and dried flowers placed for adornment—of what? Then come the nooses and garrottes—wires and ropes—some hanging loose, some stretched taut, decorated with ribbons or hooks and loops to hang the street-trader’s merchandise, or merely forgotten and cutting into the bark. And there is the wounded heart, cut with deep, desperate strokes, on the blazed bark of one of the trees still standing; a heart pierced by an arrow saying, “Sundari, I love U”.

Fall from grace

Then the old roads were labelled tracks, the tracks became streets, the streets became roads, and the roads became highways. And yet, we are not satisfied, we need super-highways. This idea brooks no questioning, no obstruction. The trees must make way for tarmac. The people who stood in the shade must make way for the cars that proliferate. The vitality of a living countryside must make way for the deathly artificiality of the city, spreading like a virus down the arteries. The living countryside and its other users don’t really matter: they mostly don’t have cars, anyway.

The tamarind trees are now painted with broad waist-bands in white and black, so that they are more visible to the highway motorist who can then avoid them. How effectively we mark something to be more visible and to be more ignored at once!

So, the tamarind trees drift into wayside anonymity, from anonymity to disuse, disuse to neglect. The fruits fall and are crushed under the tyres of vehicles. The road surface is studded with hard, shining seeds driven into hot tar, staring like eyes without eyelids at the sun and sky. Shade and greenery are replaced by heat and grime. The screech of parakeets and chuckle of mynas is replaced by the endless screech of tyres and squeal of brakes. The hoot of owls is deafened by the toot of horns and the soughing of wind by the howling of sirens: the ambulances are now busy day and night. Places where a person could live a full, good life become sites, where one cannot even die a good death.

Now, the tamarind trees are but old fixtures in the landscape, like old people, grandparents and elders, suddenly out of place in a redefined world, suddenly unwanted. And when the old trees fall, the countryside is bereft, like families broken.

Better road sense

It does not have to end this way. Engineers and ecologists, citizens from the city and the countryside, can join hands to find better design and transportation solutions. Solutions that incorporate retaining the old trees, such as tamarinds and banyans, as essential components of roadsides for their varied and indisputable uses, and as representing a more refined aesthetic sorely needed for our cities, roads, and countryside. What call do we have to deprive those who come after us of the public utility and beauty of these grand trees?

We need to retain the trees that remain and design better roads and public transportation that includes keeping the trees. (Photo: T. R. Shankar Raman)
We need to retain the trees that remain and design better roads and public transportation that includes keeping the trees. (Photo: T. R. Shankar Raman)

Even now, many stumps of felled trees lie metres away from widened roads: one wonders why they had to be felled at all. Natural landscaping, planning service lanes around trees, traffic regulation and public transportation solutions need to be found before the engineers and bureaucrats wield the axe, albeit indirectly from behind their desks, distanced and disconnected from land and landscape. Taken as a matter of wide public importance, decisions to retain or fell such trees should be based on democratic and public debate and consultation with and concurrence of citizens and citizen groups, and involvement of representative local administrative bodies, the judiciary, and the media.

Widening roads at any cost represents a one-dimensional view of progress, that compromises other human values, capabilities, and needs, which are all not really fungible. Our increasing disconnect with these values and capabilities only erodes the deep wells of tolerance and breeds alienation between people and nature, land and culture. There are better roads, so to speak, to take, and there is time yet to take them.

Yet, it is not merely that one misses seeing the trees for the road.The tamarind trees—those still alive on the roads around Coimbatore amidst the stumps of those that are gone—seem to stand for something deeper. An awareness that beauty is forever pitted against the peril of loss and tolerance against the spectre of alienation. Only when we cannot bear alienation, will we usher in tolerance. Only when we cannot countenance loss, will we embrace beauty.

It does not have to end this way. Engineers and ecologists, citizens from the city and the countryside, can join hands to find better design and transportation solutions. Solutions that incorporate retaining the old trees, such as tamarinds and banyans, as essential components of roadsides for their varied and indisputable uses, and as representing a more refined aesthetic sorely needed for our cities, roads, and countrysides. What call do we have to deprive those who come after us of the public utility and beauty of these grand trees?

Even now, many stumps of felled trees lie metres away from widened roads: one wonders why they had to be felled at all. Natural landscaping, planning service lanes around trees, traffic regulation and public transportation solutions need to be found before the engineers and bureaucrats wield the axe, albeit indirectly from behind their desks, distanced and disconnected from land and landscape. Taken as a matter of wide public importance, decisions to retain or fell such trees should be based on democratic and public debate and consultation with and concurrence of citizens and citizen groups, and involvement of representative local administrative bodies, the judiciary, and the media.

Widening roads at any cost represents a one-dimensional view of progress, that compromises other human values, capabilities, and needs, which are all not really fungible. Our increasing disconnect with these values and capabilities only erodes the deep wells of tolerance and breeds alienation between people and nature, land and culture. There are better roads, so to speak, to take, and there is time yet to take them.

The pigeon’s passengers

The pigeon’s passengers

There is a modesty in their conquest of mountains. From the heights, they commandeer vistas of rugged mountains covered in forest or countryside dotted with great trees. From tall trees on high ridges, they scan the landscape, their heads turning on long and graceful necks. They have scaled peaks, even surpassed them. Yet, they speak only in soft and hushed tones that resonate among stately trees. For the imperial pigeons are a dignified lot, keeping the company of great trees.

Down in the valley, the pigeon’s voice throbs through dense rainforest: a deep hu, hoo-uk, hoo-uk, repeated after long pauses, like the hoots of an owl. In the dawn chorus of birdsong, it sounds like a sedate basso profundo trying to slow the tempo of barbets and calm the errant flutes and violins of babblers and thrushes. The calling pigeon, in a flock with others, is in a low symplocos tree whose branches shine with dark green leaves and purple-blue fruit. They are busy picking and swallowing the ripe fruits, each with fleshy pulp around a single stony seed.

These large birds, neatly plumaged in formal greys and pastel browns, are Mountain Imperial Pigeons—a species found in the rainforests of the Western Ghats and the Himalaya in India.

Mountain Imperial Pigeon (Ducula badia) in a rainforest in north-east India. (Photo: Ramki Sreenivasan/Conservation India)
Mountain Imperial Pigeon (Ducula badia) in a rainforest in north-east India. (Photo: Ramki Sreenivasan/Conservation India)

In more open forests and on grand banyan and other fig trees along the roads through the countryside, one can see their cousins, the Green Imperial Pigeons shaded in more verdant sheen.

Green Imperial Pigeon (Ducula aenea) on a fruiting fig tree. (Photo: Ramki Sreenivasan/Conservation India)
Green Imperial Pigeon (Ducula aenea) on a fruiting fig tree. (Photo: Ramki Sreenivasan/Conservation India)

As a group, the imperial pigeons have a penchant for fruit that necessitates roaming wide areas in search of food. Weeks may pass in a patch of forest with no sign of pigeons, but when the wild fruits ripen, the nomadic flocks descend from distant sites and the forest resonates with their calls again.

The transporter

Like other birds such as hornbills and barbets in these forests, imperial pigeons eat fruits ranging from small berries to large drupes, including wild nutmegs and laurels and elaeocarps (rudraksh). Yet, the pigeon’s bill is small and delicate in comparison with the hornbill’s horny casque or the barbet’s stout beak, which seem more suited to handling large fruits with big stony seeds. The imperial pigeon’s solution to this problem is a cleverly articulated lower beak and extensible gape and gullet that can stretch to swallow the entire fruit and seed.

Lured by the package of pulpy richness in fruit, the pigeon then becomes a transporter of seed. Many seeds are dropped in the vicinity of the mother tree itself, scattered around with seeds from rotting fruit fallen on the earth below. The concentrated stockpile of seeds below elaeocarp and nutmeg trees are attacked by rodents and beetles, leaving little hope for survival and germination. But when the pigeon takes wing, some seeds go with the pigeon as passengers on a vital journey, travelling metres to miles into the surrounding landscape. Voided eventually by the pigeon, the dispersed seeds have an altogether greater prospect of escape from gnawing rat and boring beetle and—when directly or fortuitously dropped onto a suitable spot—of germination. By carrying and literally dropping off their passengers where some establish as seedlings and grow into trees, the pigeons become both current consumers and future producers of fruit.

Still, it is the quiet achievement of the trees that seems more impressive. Rooted to a spot, the trees have enticed the pigeons to move their seeds for them. Deep in the forest, one discovers a seedling where no trees of that kind stand nearby, bringing a rare pleasure like an unexpected meeting with an old friend. The pigeons are plied with fruit and played by the trees. The modest conquest of the mountains by the pigeons is trumped by the subtler conquest of the pigeons by the immobile trees.

Peril of extinction

In speaking of the pigeon’s passengers, one recalls with misgiving the fate of Passenger Pigeons. The Passenger Pigeon was once found in astounding abundance across North America in flocks numbering tens of millions—flocks so huge that their migratory flights would darken the skies for days on end. Yet, even this species was exterminated by unmitigated slaughter under the guns of hunters and by the collection—during their enormous nesting congregations—of chicks (squabs) by the truck-load. Within a few decades, the great flocks and society of Passenger Pigeons were decimated in vast landscapes transformed by axe and plough, plunder and profiteering. By 1914, the species—at the time perhaps one of the most abundant land bird species in the world—had been reduced to a single captive female. The last known Passenger Pigeon, Martha, died in Cincinnati Zoo in September 1914, closing the page on another wonderful species, in another sorry chapter of human history on Earth.

Our pigeons are more fortunate, but in many areas they, too, are dying a slow death. Some fall to the bullets of hunters who take strange pride in their dubious sport or skill. Some roam large areas of once-continuous rainforest, which now have only scattered fragments. The mountain imperial pigeons are still seen winging across in powerful flight from one remnant to another, over monoculture plantations and stagnant reservoirs. Their forays are getting longer, and their journeys often end fruitless. Our countryside, too, is becoming bereft of their green cousins, as grand banyans and other fruit trees vanish along our widening roads, and diverse forests of native trees are replaced by miserable Australian acacias and eucalyptus, if they are replaced at all. As their homes are whittled away, the hornbills, barbets, and other pigeons vanish silently. With them vanish subtle splendours and prospects of regeneration. On the roads, the vehicles speed along on their wheels of progress, carrying passengers of a different kind, barely aware of the majesty and opportunity for renewal left behind.

From the valley, the imperial pigeons take wing and—in a minute—fly high and swift over the mountain to distant rainforest. There, sometime in the future, new seedlings will perhaps still emerge in a silent testimony. A testimony that one can forever fly high and strong if one only consumes what one also regenerates in perpetuity.

This article appeared in The Hindu Sunday Magazine on 6 May 2012, and in the In School edition on 9 May 2012.

Restoration in the Palani hills

Restoration in the Palani hills

A lovely article written by Ian Lockwood, which seems most appropriate to read today—Earth Day, 2012—has been published in Frontline. The article ‘Breathing life back into the sholas‘, which also talks about ecological restoration, is accompanied by a little box item explaining this as a ‘New idea in India‘. The article speaks of the unique shola – grassland ecosystems of the high mountains of the Western Ghats and of the ongoing work there on restoration of sholas and grasslands that have been degraded, destroyed, or badly affected by invasions of alien plant species. For those not familiar with Ian Lockwood, he is a brilliant photographer, educator, and writer, whose work you can see in the website High Range Photography and on his blog.

It is well worth picking up your copy of Frontline magazine (Volume 29 – Issue 07 dated April 7-20, 2012) just to see the beautiful photographs, especially the black-and-white landscape shots and panoramas that Ian Lockwood is famous for. You can see a preview of some page spreads on Ian’s blog here. Frontline is one of the few magazines that frequently carries full-length and detailed articles on the environment along with photographs and it is always nice to read a piece such as this in the magazine.

Lockwood’s article describes the unique montane landscape, its history, and conservation concerns, all of which serve as the backdrop for the ongoing ecological restoration work by a local NGO, the Vattakanal Conservation Trust (VCT). Through pioneering restoration efforts and partnership with the Tamil Nadu Forest Department, VCT is working to change the way we view and conserve the larger landscape.

In our own restoration work here in the Anamalai hills, we have learned much from and been inspired by the work of VCT, especially Tanya Balcar and Robert (Bob) Stewart of VCT. Bob and Tanya, both founders of VCT, are a couple of British origin settled in Kodaikanal for over 25 years. Sharing a deep passion for native plant species and their conservation, they are self-taught, top-notch botanists with wide experience of the incredible diversity of plants in the Western Ghats, including in the Palani hills. Concerned over the widespread degradation, especially in the Upper Palanis, for more than two decades now they have also done pioneering work on ecological restoration. This includes careful floristic studies, development of germination techniques of hundreds of plant species of shola forests and grasslands, implementation of restoration of highly degraded sites to sholas and their again-pioneering efforts at restoration of the unique montane grasslands (the famed habitat of the kurinji). Their contributions are also recorded in the monumental 3 volume The Flora of the Palni Hills by K. M. Matthew, one of the botanical treatises and authoritative reference works to emerge from Southern India.

Bob and Tanya and the VCT staff also maintain one of the longest-standing and diverse native plant nurseries in the region, besides having developed a grassland nursery and techniques to propagate native grassland plants. These are also documented in a chapter in our joint publication here. Their success in convincing the bureaucracy of the need for ecological restoration using native shola and grassland species and in working with committed officers is something to be respected and emulated. Their work is also showing insights into the effects of alien plantations on grasslands and wetlands, and water tables, and how ecological restoration can help to reverse the tide of degradation with benefits both for nature conservation and local people. Ian Lockwood has also written articles earlier, including in Sanctuary Asia and Frontline, with a highly appreciative but modest mention of VCT, all of which you can find linked on his blog. Taken together, this set of articles, documents well the context and significance of the region and the ongoing restoration work.

ஒரு மழைக்காட்டு விதையின் பயணம்

ஒரு மழைக்காட்டு விதையின் பயணம்

காட்டுப்பாதையெங்கும் சிதறி கிடங்கின்றன விதைகள். கிருஷ்ணா மெல்லக் குனிந்து அவற்றை எடுத்து தான் கொண்டுவந்த பையில் சேகரித்துக்கொண்டிருக்கிறான். கிருஷ்ணாவிற்குத் தெரியும் இவை சாதாரண விதைகள் அல்ல என்று. இனி வரும் காலங்களில் வளர்ந்து பெரிய மரமாகி சிங்கவால் குரங்கிற்கும், பலவிதமான பழம் உண்ணும் பறவைகளுக்கு உணவளிக்கும், பெரிய இருவாசியும் (Great Hornbill),  பறக்கும் அணிலுக்கும், மலையணிலுக்கும் கூடமைக்க இடம் கொடுக்கும், யானைகூட்டத்திற்கு நிழலளிக்கும்…

விதைகள் சேகரிப்பு

சாலையோரத்தில் இருந்த ஒரு காட்டுக்கொடியில் பழம் பழுத்திருந்தது. அதன் கீழே அப்பழத்தின் விதையைக் கொண்ட எச்சம் சாய்ந்து கிடந்த மரத்தின் மீது கிருஷ்ணா பார்த்தான். அந்த எச்சத்தைப் பார்த்த உடனே அது பழுப்பு மரநாயினுடையது என்பதை அவன் கண்டுகொண்டான். அக்காட்டுக்கொடியின் (Liana) தண்டு மென்மையானது அல்ல, அது ஒரு சிறிய மரத்தின் அளவிலும், மிக உறுதியானதாகவும் இருந்தது. இவை காட்டுமரங்களின் மேல் பின்னிப்பினைந்து பழுப்பு மரநாயும், சிங்கவால் குரங்குகளும் தரையின் கீழ் இறங்காமலேயே இக்கொடிகளைப் பற்றி மரம் விட்டு மரம் செல்ல உதவிசெய்யும். அதற்கு கைமாறாக இவ்விலங்குகள் இக்காட்டுகொடியின் பழத்தை உண்டு தமது எச்சத்தின் வழியாக அவற்றின் விதையை வெவ்வேறு இடங்களுக்கு பரப்பும்.

கிருஷ்ணா அந்த காட்டுக்கொடியின் விதையையும், பலவிதமான மரவிதைகளையும் ஒரு பையின் சேகரித்து அருகில் இருந்த நாற்றுப்பண்ணைக்கு வந்தான். சேகரித்த விதைகளை ஒவ்வொன்றாக மண் நிரம்பிய பைகளில் நட்டு வைத்தான். ஏற்கனவே நட்டு வைத்த பலவிதமான மரவிதைகளில் சில முளைவிட ஆரம்பித்திருந்தன. மூன்று வருடத்திற்குமுன் நடப்பட்ட விதைகள் கிட்டத்தட்ட 2-3 அடி உயரத்திற்கு வளர்ந்திருந்தது. இம்மர நாற்றுகளெல்லாம் சாதாரணமானவை அல்ல. இவையனைத்தும் பல்லுயிர்த்தன்மைக்குப் பெயர்போன மேற்குத்தொடர்ச்சி மலைத்தொடரில் இருப்பவை. நாற்றுப்பண்ணை இருக்குமிடம் வால்பாறை.

மழைக்காட்டுத் தாவரங்களைக் கொண்ட நாற்றுப்பண்ணை

பத்து வருடங்களுக்கு முன் செயலார்வம் மிக்க, காட்டுயிர் ஆராய்ச்சியாளர் குழு ஒன்று மழைகாட்டு மீளமைப்புத்திட்டத்தை இங்கு ஆரம்பித்தது. திவ்யா முத்தப்பா, சங்கர் ராமன், ஆனந்த குமார் முதலியோர் அப்பகுதியின் பூர்வீகக் குடியினரான காடர்களில் உதவியுடன் 2000ம் ஆண்டு வால்பாறையில் இத்திட்டத்தைத் தொடங்கினர். இவர்களின் ஒரே குறிக்கோள் இப்பகுதியிலுள்ள சீரழிந்த நிலையிலுள்ள மழைக்காட்டுத்தீவுகளை அம்மண்ணுக்குச் சொந்தமான மரங்களை நட்டு மீளமைப்பதுதான் (Rainforest Restoration).

அது என்ன மழைக்காட்டுத்தீவு? அதற்கு முதலில் மழைக்காடுகளைப்பற்றியும் (Tropical rainforest)அவற்றின் முக்கியத்துவத்தையும் பற்றி அறிந்திருக்க வேண்டும்.

அதிக மழையும், சூடான தட்பவெப்பமும், உயரமான மரங்களும் கொண்ட பூமத்தியரேகைப்பகுதியில் காணப்படும் காட்டுப்பகுதியே மழைக்காடுகளாகும். மழைக்காடுகள் ஆப்பிரிக்கா, ஆசியா, ஆஸ்திரேலியா, மத்திய மற்றும் தென் அமெரிக்கப்பகுதிகளில் பரவியுள்ளது. மழைக்காடு பல்லுயிரியத்தில் மிகச்சிறந்தது. இப்பூமியின் பரப்பளவில் 2%கும் குறைவாகவே இருந்தாலும் இவ்வுலகின் 50%கும் மேற்பட்ட தாவரங்களையும் விலங்குகளையும் தனதே கொண்டுள்ளது. உலகில் வேறெங்கும் வசிக்காத உயிரினங்கள் பலவற்றை (ஓரிட வாழிவிகள் – Endemics) இம்மழைக்காடுகளில் காணலாம்.

பூமத்திய ரேகைக்கு அருகாமையில் அமைந்துள்ளதால் அதிக சூரிய ஒளியைப் பெற்று தாவரங்கள் ஒளிச்சேர்க்கையினால் இவ்வொளியைச் சக்தியாக மாற்றுகின்றன. தாவரங்களில் சேமிக்கப்பட்ட அபரிமிதமான இச்சக்தியே மழைக்காட்டிலுள்ள விலங்குகளுக்கு உணவாக அமைகிறது. அதிக உணவு இருப்பதால் அதிக விலங்குகளும் மழைக்காடுகளில் வாழ்கின்றன. இப்புவியின் உயிர்ச்சூழக்கு மழைக்காடுகளின் சேவை மிகவும் அத்தியாவசியமானது. ஏனெனில் மழைக்காடுகள் பலவிதமான தாவரங்களுக்கும் விலங்குகளுக்கும் உறைவிடமாகிறது, உலகின் தட்பவெப்பநிலையை நிலைநிறுத்துகிறது, வெள்ளம், வறட்சி மற்றும் மண்ணரிப்பிலிருந்து பாதுகாக்கிறது, பலவித மூலிகைகள் மற்றும் உணவிற்கு மூலாதாரமாக இருக்கிறது.

இப்புவிக்கும், மனிதகுலத்திற்கும் தேவையான இப்படிப்பட்ட மழைக்காடுகள் உலகில் எல்லா பகுதிகளிலும் சகட்டுமேனிக்கு அழிக்கப்பட்டன, தொடர்ந்து அழிக்கப்பட்டு வருகின்றன. இந்தியாவில் இவ்விதமான மழைக்காடுகள் அடர்ந்து இருப்பது மேற்குத்தொடர்ச்சி மலைப்பகுதிகளிலும், அஸ்ஸாம், அருனாசல பிரதேசம் போன்ற வடகிழக்கு மாநிலங்களிலும் தான். மழைக்காடுகளைப் பற்றி மேலும் கீழ்கண்ட உரலியில் அறியலாம்

http://hindi.mongabay.com/tamil/kids/

மழைக்காடுகள் மிகுந்திருந்த மேற்குத்தொடர்ச்சி மலைப்பகுதியில் தேயிலை, காப்பி போன்ற ஓரினப்பயிர்த்தோட்டங்களுக்காகவும், நீர்மின் திட்டங்களுக்காகவும், வெட்டுமரத்தொழிலுக்காகவும் கடந்த சில நூற்றாண்டுகளாக வெகுவாக திருத்தப்பட்டன. இதனால் மழைக்காடுகள் பல இடங்களில் முற்றிலுமாக அழிக்கப்பட்டு, தொடர்பற்று துண்டுதுண்டாகிப்போனது. இப்படிப்பட்ட இடங்களில் ஒன்றுதான் மேற்குத்தொடர்ச்சிமலையிலுள்ள ஆனைமலைப் பகுதியில் இருக்கும்  வால்பாறை. இங்கு கண்ணுக்கெட்டும் தூரம் வரை பச்சைப்பசேலென தேயிலைத்தொட்டங்களைக் காணலாம். காப்பி, தேயிலை, ஏலம், யூக்கலிப்டஸ் போன்ற ஓரினத்தாவரத் தோட்டங்களின் நடுவே இவை பயிரிடத்தகுதியில்லாத இடங்களில் இன்னும் திருத்தி அமைக்கப்படாத மழைக்காடுகள் சிறியதும் பெரியதுமாக ஆங்காங்கே தீவுகளைப்போல காட்சியளிக்கும். இவையே மழைக்காட்டுத்தீவுகள் (Rainforest fragment), இங்குள்ள மக்கள் இவற்றை துண்டுச்சோலை என்றழைக்கின்றனர்.

அணையும், தேயிலைத் தோட்டமும் சூழ, மத்தியில் அமைந்திருக்கும் (இளம்பச்சை எல்லைக்கோட்டுக்குள்) மழைக்காட்டுத்தீவு. இதில் வாழும் பல உயிரினங்கள் வாழ்நாள் முழுதும் இத்துண்டுச்சோலையை விட்டு வேறெங்கும் இடம்பெயர முடியாது.

இத்துண்டுச்சோலைகள் மிகவும் முக்கியத்துவம் வாய்ந்தவை. ஏனெனில் வால்பாறையைச்சுற்றிலும் ஆனைமலை புலிகள் காப்பகம், பரம்பிகுளம் புலிகள் காப்பகம், வாழச்சால் வனப்பகுதி, எரவிகுளம் தேசிய பூங்கா, சின்னார் சரணாலயம் போன்ற தொடர்ந்த பரந்து விரிந்த பாதுகாக்கப்பட்ட வனப்பகுதிகள் அமைந்துள்ளன. இதனால் சுற்றிலும் வனத்தைக் கொண்ட வால்பாறை பகுதியிலும் பலவிதமான அரிய, அழிவின் விளிம்பில் இருக்கும் விலங்குகளையும், தாவரங்களையும் பார்க்க முடியும். இந்த உயிரினங்களுக்கெல்லாம் புகலிடமாக இத்துண்டுச்சோலைகள் உள்ளன. ஆகவே இந்தச் சிறிய வனப்பகுதிகளை பாதுகாப்பது இன்றியமையாதது. ஆனால் மக்கள்தொகை பெருக்கத்தால் வனச்செல்வங்கள் நாளுக்கு நாள் அருகிவரும் நிலையில் இந்த துண்டுச்சோலைகளும் அதிலிள்ள உயிரினங்களும் கூட அபாயநிலையில் உள்ளன. திருட்டு வேட்டை, வீட்டு உபயோகத்திற்காக மரங்களை வெட்டுதல், களைகள் பெருகி காட்டிலுள்ள தாவரங்களை வளரவிடாமல் தடுத்தல், ஓரினப்பயிர்களுக்காக இச்சிறிய காடுகளையும் கூடத் திருத்தி அமைத்தல், இத்துண்டுச்சோலைகளின் உள்ளேயும் ஓரமாகவும் செல்லும் சாலைகளை விரிவுபடுத்து போன்ற காரணங்களினால் இத்துண்டுச்சோலைகளும் இதில் வாழும் உயிரின்ங்களும் கொஞ்சம் கொஞ்சமாக சிதைந்து வருகின்றன.

வால்பாறை மனித-விலங்கு மோதலுக்குப் பெயர் போன இடம். யானைத்திரள் மக்கள் குடியிருப்புகளின் அருகில் வருவதும், மதிய உணவுக்கூடங்களிலும், ரேஷன் கடைகளிலும் வைத்திருக்கும் அரிசி, பருப்பு மூட்டைகளை உட்கொள்வதும், சிறுத்தைகள் மனிதர்களைத் தாக்குவது போன்ற விபத்தும் அவ்வப்போது இங்கு நிகழும். வால்பாறைப் பகுதியிலுள்ள துண்டுச்சோலைகள் இல்லையெனில் இவ்வகையான மோதல்கள் பன்மடங்காகப் பெருகும் வாய்ப்புள்ளதால் இப்பகுதிகளைப் பாதுகாக்க வேண்டியது மிகவும் அவசியம். ஆகவே அரசுசாரா நிறுவனமான இயற்கை காப்பு கழகத்தைச் சேர்ந்த ஆராய்ச்சியாளர்கள் இப்பகுதியிலுள்ள தனியார் தேயிலை மற்றும் காப்பித் தோட்ட உறிமையாளர்களான பாரி அக்ரோ, டாடா காப்பி, பாம்பே பர்மா டிரேடிங் கார்பரேஷன், ஹிந்துஸ்தான் லீவர் (தற்போதைய உரிமையாளர் – வுட் பிரையர் குரூப்) முதலிய நிறுவன அதிகாரிகளிடம் அவர்களுடைய இடங்களிலுள்ள துண்டுச்சோலைகளின் முக்கியத்துவத்தை எடுத்துரைத்து சிதைந்துவரும் இம்மழைக்காட்டுத்தீவுகளை மீளமைக்க அனுமதி பெற்றனர்.

இந்த மழைக்காட்டு மீளமைப்புத் திட்டம் தனித்தன்மை வாய்ந்தது. ஏனெனில் காட்டுயிர் பாதுகாப்பும், ஆராய்ச்சியும் பொதுவாக அரசுக்குச் சொந்தமான பாதுகாக்கப்பட்ட இடங்களில் தான் நடக்கும். ஆனால் வால்பாறை பகுதி தனியாருக்குச் செந்தமான மேலே குறிப்பிட்ட பல நிறுவனங்களுக்குச் சொந்தமானவை. இந்நிலங்களிலேயே இத்துண்டுச்சோலைகள் அமைந்துள்ளன. இந்த மீளமைப்புப் பணியில் உதவ காட்டுயிரியலாளர்கள், ஆனைமலைப்பகுதியின் பூர்வீகக்குடியினரான காடர்களை வேலைக்குச் சேர்த்துக்கொண்டுள்ளனர். பல தனியார் நிறுவனங்களும், காட்டுயிரியலாளர்களும், உள்ளூர் மக்களும் இணைந்து பல்லுயிர் பாதுகாப்பிற்காக கூட்டு முயற்சி செய்வதாலேயே இத்திட்டம் மிகவும் முக்கியத்துவம் பெறுகிறது.

அனுமதியும் இடமும் கிடைத்தாகிவிட்டது. அடுத்த கட்டமாக 800-1300 மீ உயரத்திலிருக்கும் மழைக்காட்டுப்பகுதியில் தென்படும் மரங்களின் பட்டியலை மீளமைப்புக் குழுவினர் தயார் செய்து, சாலையோரங்களில் விழுந்து கிடக்கும் அம்மரங்களின் விதைகளைச் சேகரித்து நாற்றுப்பண்ணையில் வைத்து வளர்க்க ஆரம்பித்தனர். விதைகள் முளைவிடுவதும் வேறு இடத்தில் கொண்டு சென்று நடுவதற்கான முதிர்ச்சியை அடைவது மரத்திற்கு மரம் மாறுபடும். சில மரவகைகள் முளைவிடுவதற்கே பல மாதங்கள் ஆகும். மழைக்காட்டு மர விதைகளை தினமும் தண்ணிர் ஊற்றி, இயற்கை உரமிட்டு பூச்சிகளிடமிருந்தும், கொறிக்கும் எலிகளிடமிருந்தும் காப்பாற்றி பிள்ளைகள் போல வளர்க்கப்படுகிறது. பாதுகாப்பாகவும், மிகுந்த கவனத்துடனும் வளர்க்கப்பட்ட இந்நாற்றுகள் 3-4 ஆண்டுகள் கழித்து தென்மேற்குப்பருவ மழைக்காலங்களில்தான் பண்ணையை விட்டு  துண்டுச்சோலைகளில் கொண்டு சென்று நடப்படுகின்றன. கொட்டும் மழையில், மலைச்சரிவுகளில், அட்டைகள் இரத்தம் உறிய குழி தோண்டி, அக்குழியில் சிறிது இயற்கை உரமிட்டு, உறைகளில் அடைபட்டிருந்த வேர்களைக்கொண்ட மழைக்காட்டு மர நாற்று அது இருக்க வேண்டிய இடத்திற்கு கொண்டு சேர்க்கிறார்கள் இம்மீளமைப்புக் குழுவினர்.

மழைக்காட்டு நாற்று நடும் நடும் Dr. ஆனந்தகுமார்.

நம் ஊர்களில் நடக்கும் மரம் நடும் விழாக்களில் சம்பிரதாயத்திற்கு நினைத்த இடத்தில் ஒரு மரத்தை நட்டுவிட்டு போட்டோவிற்கு போஸ் கொடுத்துவிட்டு அதன்பின் அதை திரும்பிக்கூட பார்க்கமாட்டோம். ஆனால் இது அப்படியல்ல. எந்த இடத்தில் எவ்வகையான மரங்களை நடுவது என்பது முன்பே தீர்மானிக்கப்படுகிறது (மலையின் உயரத்திற்கு ஏற்றாற்போல் அவ்வுயரத்திலிருக்கும் தாவர வகையும் மாறுபடும்). நடுவதற்கு முன் அவ்விடங்களில் களைச்செடிகள் அகற்றப்படுகின்றன. துண்டுச்சோலை அதிகமாக சிதைக்கப்பட்டிருந்தால் அதற்குத் தகுந்தவாறு அதன் ஓரங்களில் வெட்டவெளியில் வளரும் மரவகைகளும், மூடிய விதானத்தினுள்ளே நிழலின் கீழ் வளரும் மரங்களும் நடப்படுகிறது. நட்டுவைக்கப்படும் ஒவ்வொரு நாற்றிலும் அடையாளத்திற்காக பளிச்சென்று தெரியும் நிறத்தில் சிறிய பிளாஸ்டிக் பட்டைகள் கட்டிவைக்கப்படுகின்றன. இதை வைத்து ஒவ்வொரு ஆண்டும் நடப்பட்ட மொத்த நாற்றுகளில் எத்தனை உயிர்பிழைக்கின்றன எப்பது கணக்கிடப்படுகிறது. நாற்றுகளை நட்டபின் அவ்வப்போது இடத்திற்குத் தகுந்தாற் போல் அப்பகுதியில் வளரும் களைகள் அப்புறப்படுத்தப்படுகின்றன. இது நட்டுவைக்கப்பட்ட மழைக்காட்டு நாற்று வளர ஏதுசெய்கிறது. ஓரளவிற்கு இந்நாற்றுகள் வளர்ந்தபின் அவற்றின் நிழலுக்கடியில் களைகள் வளராது.

கடந்த 12 ஆண்டுகளாக வால்பாறைப் பகுதியில் மொத்தம் சுமார் 50 ஹெக்டேர் பரப்பில் கிட்டத்தட்ட 50,000 ஆயிரம் நாற்றுகள் நடப்பட்டுள்ளன. இவையணைத்தும் ஒரே வகையானவை அல்ல. மழைக்காட்டில் வளரும் மரங்கள், பெருங்கொடிகள், பிரம்பு என சுமார் 150 வகையான தாவரங்களை சிதைந்துபோன மழைக்காட்டுத் துண்டுச்சோலையிலும், காப்பித்தோட்டங்களுக்கு நிழல் மரமாகவும் நடப்பட்டுள்ளன. வனத்திலுள்ள ஒரு மரத்தை வெட்டிச்சாய்க்க எத்தனை மணிநேரங்கள் ஆகும்? 50 ஹெக்டேர் பரப்புள்ள வனத்தை அழிக்க எவ்வளவு நாளாகும்?  ஆனால் ஒரு விதையை முளைக்க வைத்து வளர்த்து ஆளாக்கி அதனிடத்தில் கொண்டு சேர்த்து, கவனமாக பராமரித்து பாதுகாத்த பின் அம்மரம் அடைந்த உயரம் எவ்வளவு தெரியுமா? சுமார் 10 லிருந்து 15 மீட்டர். இதற்கு 12 ஆண்டுகள் பிடிக்கிறது!

மீளமைக்கப்பட்ட ஒரு மழைக்காட்டுப் பகுதி.
மழைக்காட்டு நாற்றுகளை நடும் முன்னும் (இடது) மூன்று ஆண்டுகளுக்குப் பின்னும் (வலது).

ஒரு மழைக்காட்டு மர விதை முளைத்து, துளிர் விட்டு, நாற்றாகி, மரமாக உயர்ந்து வளர்வதற்குள் பல விதமான இன்னல்களை சந்திக்க நேரிடுகின்றது. வறட்சியிலிருந்தும், நாம் காட்டுக்குள் கொண்டு செல்லும் ஆடு, மாடுகளிடமிருந்தும், அங்கு வாழும் தாவர உண்ணிகளிடமிருந்தும், சூரிய ஒளிக்காக, நீருக்காக அதனைச்சுற்றியுள்ள தாவரங்களிடமிருந்தும், களைச்செடிகளிடமிருந்தும் எல்லாவற்றிற்கும் மேலாக மரவெட்டியின் கோடாலியிடமிருந்தும் தப்பிக்க வேண்டும்.

கிருஷ்ணாவும், இயற்கை பாதுகாப்பு நிறுவனத்தின் மழைக்காட்டு மீளமைப்புத் திட்டக் குழுவினரும், இந்த மழைக்காட்டு மரங்களின் நெடுந்தூரப் பயணத்தை தொடங்கி மட்டுமே வைத்துக்கொண்டிருக்கின்றனர். எந்த ஒரு பயணத்திற்கும் முக்கியமானது நாம் எடுத்து வைக்கும் முதல் படிதானே. சேர வேண்டிய இடத்தை அடைந்துவிடுவோம் என்ற நம்பிக்கையில்தானே பயணத்தைத் தொடங்குகிறோம். அதைப்போலவே இவர்களும், தாம் நட்டுவைக்கும் இம்மரங்கள் தழைத்து, பிற்காலத்தில் வானை முட்டும் அளவிற்கு நெடுந்துயர்ந்து, இங்கு திரியும் பெரிய இருவாசிகளுக்கும், பழுப்பு மரநாய்களுக்கும் பழங்களை அளித்து இவை இம்மரங்களின் விதைகளைப் பல்வேறு இடங்களுக்குப் பரப்பி காட்டினைச் செழிக்கச்செய்யும் என நம்புகிறார்கள். நம்பிக்கைத்தானே வாழ்க்கையே!

11th March 2012 அன்று தினமணி நாளிதழின் “கொண்டாட்டம்” ஞாயிறு இணைப்பில் வெளியான கட்டுரை இது. அக்கட்டுரைக்கான உரலி இதோ:

http://dinamani.com/weekly_supplements/sunday_kondattam/article888141.ece

மேற்குத்தொடர்ச்சி மலையின் மழைக்காடுகளை மீளமைக்கும் வழிமுறைகளை விளக்கும் ஒரு சிறு நூலை இங்கு காணலாம் (PDF).

மேலும் விவரங்களுக்கு, இயற்கை காப்புக் கழகத்தின் (NCF) மழைகாட்டு மீளமைப்புத் திட்டதினை விளக்கும் இணையத்தளத்தினைக் ( http://www.ncf-india.org/restoration/) காணவும்.

மழைக்காட்டு மீளமைப்புத் திட்டத்தினைப் பற்றிய குறும்படத்தை இங்கே காணலாம்.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lPGD0YgvHKA

Tinker, tailor, soldier, spy: a personal decade from 9/11

Tinker, tailor, soldier, spy: a personal decade from 9/11

Ten years. A decade to the day since Sridhar stood in front of a room full of people defending, if that is the word, his doctoral thesis. On the other side of the planet, in another hemisphere like a parallel world, four airplanes filled with deadly purpose would take to the air. They would bring down buildings—facade and edifice—marking a charged moment in history like a bee-stung blister on the warp of time.

The twin towers on 11 September 2001 (Courtesy: Wikipedia)
The twin towers on 11 September 2001 (Courtesy: Wikipedia)

Shorn of a veneer of power and safety, the Western world would begin to look at places and people, with new eyes.

God created war so that Americans would learn geography.
~ Mark Twain

In The Sense of an Ending, a haunting, poignant little novel with brilliantly portrayed characters, Julian Barnes looks at history and consequence in an impeccable storyline where every word tells. The narration draws you inward and outward, time flowing like a river and like the Severn Bore, the tidal surge heading upstream. Barnes draws you into thinking about the nature of memory and the narrative of history. Reading the book is like taking a ferry down a magic river: you step in, you go with the flow watching the breaking bow wave and the destination ahead, only to arrive at the end and see the fading, shimmering wake, as if for the first time, in revelation.

Someone once said that his favourite times in history were when things were collapsing, because that meant something new was being born. Does this make any sense if we apply it to our individual lives?
~ Julian Barnes, The Sense of an Ending

What is a defining moment in our lives? Is it real, in a cartesian sense, that its location is fixed, like a tree standing in a savanna or a great peak rising above its range? Or is it like a leaf that falls on the unsullied surface of a stream, giving a temporary purchase to the eye to follow its course, from an arbitrary beginning when it touches the water, to an undefined end where the swash has tossed it among windrows of wrack?

Success in defending a doctoral thesis and the degree and prefix that it confers is sometimes taken to be such a moment. You have presented your research in a scientific, clear, logical, objective manner. You have masked your interest with disinterest, inspiration with interpretation. Your peers and sages have frowned or questioned, nodded in agreement or in boredom, have smiled, snickered, paused in thought, in wonder, even. In the end, you are marked as having crossed an invisible threshold and admitted as a hallowed legatee of academe. And thus the leaf drops on the stream to bob and wind with other leaves, drifting with the current and slewing of its own shape, finding its course.

It is an arbitrary course and can take an arbitrary name. To loosely thread a story of a decade, a title borrowed from a John le Carré novel, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, will do nicely, but set in reverse.

Spy

If a spy is taken to be an observer, a sourcer of information, meant to analyse and report factually on what is sourced and observed, doing this in a sort of self-effacing manner, remaining detached, possibly hidden, inconspicuous, then perhaps field biologists are spies, too. So, in 2001, several years of field research in deep rainforest had led the two of us to our doctoral degrees.

In the rainforests ...
In the rainforests of Kalakad - Mundanthurai ... (Photo by P. Jeganathan, 7 March 1999)

Even as thousands of men, armed to the teeth, went warring at the fall of buildings, we went, too, armed with little more than a prefix and binoculars to add a few bricks on a wall of learning. In the rainforests of the Western Ghats, we had studied birds (Sridhar) and civets and other small carnivorous mammals (Divya) and we knew that our theses were both of limited-enough scope to leave space for much more. Then, along with Anand and many student recruits, we studied plants and hornbills, civets and elephants, pattern and process, creatures large and small. We kept on, as events of vastly greater import unfolded in the Middle East, between India and Pakistan, and elsewhere.

Is it really worth while to spend our time, the time which escapes us so swiftly, this stuff of life, as Montaigne calls it, in gleaning facts of indifferent moment and highly contestable utility? Is it not childish to enquire so minutely into an insect’s actions? Too many interests of a graver kind hold us in their grasp to leave us any leisure for these amusements. That is how the harsh experience of age impels us to speak; that is how I should conclude, as I bring my investigations to a close, if I did not perceive, amid the chaos of my observations, a few gleams of light toughing the loftiest problems which we are privileged to discuss. … These questions are and always will be the despair of every cultivated mind, even though the inanity of our efforts to solve them urges us to cast them into the limbo of the unknowable.
~Jean-Henri Fabre, The Mason Wasps

Out in the Anamalai hills, we plodded on, exploring forest fragments and plantations of tea, eucalyptus, coffee, and cardamom. We began to see more clearly the wounds in the landscape, newer cuts and older scar-tissue, and tried to report these faithfully, while also beginning to understand and explore the possibilities of healing.

Rainforests of yore, tea estates of today
Rainforests of yore, tea estates of today

Soldier

And as the wars raged in the world, we soldiered on, too. There were forest fragments to protect, lying in private lands outside designated protected areas. These lay in an ecological hinterland, a paradoxical one, which one sees with fresh eyes leaving remote rainforests behind and entering an apparently human domain.

Elements of the landscape: tea, shola, eucalyptus, colonies...
Elements of the landscape: tea, shola, eucalyptus, colonies...

Amidst a landscape of a hundred thousand people were troops of lion-tailed macaques, great flocks of hornbills and pigeons, butterflies and babblers, elephants, deer, fungi, mosses, incredible insects… there was life, everywhere.

Indian Scimitar-Babbler, a bird that uses plantations and forest (Photo: Kalyan Varma)
Indian Scimitar-Babbler, a bird that uses plantations and forest (Photo: Kalyan Varma)

Forgotten amidst the bustle of humanity, these fragments and the wildlife seemed at the time to need soldiers, not so much as protectors, but more as champions who could direct more appreciative eyes towards their conservation.

War must be, while we defend our lives against a destroyer who would devour all; but I do not love the bright sword for its sharpness, nor the arrow for its swiftness, nor the warrior for his glory. I love only that which they defend.”
~ J. R. R. Tolkien, The Two Towers

There were great trees to save from girdling and felling—one feels compelled to rise to the defense of what is loved or valued.

Wild nutmeg (Myristica dactyloides) tree, food of hornbills, girdled and cut in a forest fragment
Wild nutmeg (Myristica dactyloides) tree, food of hornbills, girdled and cut in a forest fragment

There were fences to erect to keep away some kinds of animals and some kinds of people—one feels a need to fight abuse of land, unjust exploitation of nature.

Good fences make good neighbours, or is it the other way around?
Good fences make good neighbours, or is it the other way around? (Photo: S. U. Saravanakumar)

Fence or defence, felling or fight, the arena is one of conflict and the space is defined by dimensions of possession, protection, and punishment. It is a cold and brutal and lonely space.

What difference does it make to the dead, the orphans and the homeless, whether the mad destruction is wrought under the name of totalitarianism or in the holy name of liberty or democracy?
~ Mahatma Gandhi

The possession of land creates owners, not stewards, protection builds walls between people and nature, and punishment singes the psyche, provokes retaliation and resentment. Wars seldom work: they beget wars, they create refugees.

Tailor

The question then arose: how do we relink the chasms that had opened, between fragmented forests, between forests and plantations, between people and nature? What bridges need to be built to stitch together an ecologically viable landscape?

Before I built a wall I’d ask to know
What I was walling in or walling out,
And to whom I was like to give offence.
Something there is that doesn’t love a wall,
That wants it down…
~ Robert Frost, Mending Wall

The plantations, our research revealed, were not barren lands for conservation. A graded intensity of production where agriculture becomes industry is matched by a gradation in the diversity of life. Plantations could act as refuges for many species, when they hold habitats such as forest and grassland remnants or use native trees of the region as shade for their crops.

A lion-tailed macaque scans from the canopy of a native tree in a coffee estate
A lion-tailed macaque scans from the canopy of a native tree in a coffee estate

Plantations can also act as corridors for the movement of larger species such as elephants and hornbills. With land-use insensitive to ecology, elephants and leopards come into conflict with people, causing loss of life or damage to property, and rivers and streams turn to swamps, water becoming a scarce resource even in areas of highest rainfall.

Downstream of a eucalyptus plantation, a river becomes a swamp through tea
Downstream of a eucalyptus plantation, a river becomes a swamp through tea

Perhaps, the planters could be influenced to take a larger landscape perspective, a larger span of time than an annual balance sheet. Perhaps the Forest Department could be brought to appreciate landscapes outside protected areas and collaborate with private owners. Perhaps local communities could begin to appreciate and marvel at what has always been around them, but subtly hidden. Perhaps companies would begin to not merely exercise their rights as owners of land, but act on responsibilities as stewards of landscapes. Perhaps they would respond not merely to demands of company shareholders, but to concerns of community stakeholders. Perhaps they would expand their bottom-line of profit to include people and planet. Perhaps we would, by working with all of them, come to understand them and our own place in the scheme of things.

The work to build such bridges, tailor relationships, and stitch broken connections, is cut out for all takers. For us, it is a work in progress.

Tinker

How do we restore our lost connections, recover degraded habitats? Can an ecosystem as complex and beautiful as a rainforest, once degraded or destroyed, ever recover? Given a relationship between people and landscapes gone awry, will conflict from loss of life and damage to property brought on by species such as elephants and leopards ever transform to coexistence? Tantalising hints and observations during our studies indicated: possibly. The first step, was to keep all the pieces: people, wildlife, forests, plantations, rivers.

To keep every cog and wheel is the first precaution of intelligent tinkering.
~ Aldo Leopold, A Sand County Almanac

Our efforts at restoring degraded rainforests, at promoting the use of native shade trees and better land-use in plantations, at understanding conflicts and fostering coexistence through targeted efforts, and restoring a more harmonious relationship between people and nature, thus began with these ideals. This, too, is a work in progress. Our strength has been in our students, our field assistants, and a few solid supporters; it is not an easy thing to take for granted and our gratitude goes to them. Still, running a decade-long program and a long-term field station has its tough moments, its difficult experiences. If our students and supporters have come to see at least partly through our eyes like we have learned within our ability to see with theirs, perhaps that is reward enough.

With slow, halting progress, sudden slip-slides of regress, we inch forward. Every year, in drenching monsoons, as we plant rainforest saplings in degraded sites, a feeling is palpable. This is a stick-in-the-mud form of conservation.

Anand practising 'stick-in-the-mud' conservation
Anand practising 'stick-in-the-mud' conservation

As the saplings grow into spindly stems, and some into robust treelets, as canopies spread and rainforest birds grace the shrubbery, as leopards sharpen their claws on the bark of trees planted by us within the eventful decade, we watch and wonder at nature resurgent, at rainforest revenant.

Fragment in Injipara, before and three years after restoration
Fragment in Injipara, before and three years after restoration

All of a decade ago, in the chapter of conclusions to Sridhar’s thesis, he began by quoting Tennyson.

I am a part of all that I have met;
Yet all experience is an arch wherethro’
Gleams that untravelled world, whose margin fades
For ever and for ever when I move.
~Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Ulysses

We now see that one can cherish these words looking not just ahead and outwards, but introspectively and into the past. We look back at our shimmering wake, already fading, trying to see and share with others the possibilities of newer courses.

Where do we go from here? We are not sure. TIme will carry us ahead, and yet, there is a longing to be back. Back in those rainforests where the journey began, in the heart of Kalakad-Mundanthurai. In a field station surrounded by rainforests and rivers, remote from people and the chattels of city life, without electricity or internet, to days before phones became mobiles, when letters were written by hand, when one could sit and gaze at mountains with meaning.

Where we lived for three years...
Where we lived for three years...

So, like The Scientist in the Coldplay album we yearn, with a pang, to ‘go back to the start’. To the start, yes, but surely not for another PhD! For renewing our vision perhaps, for but a drop of that elusive potion called inspiration. As in restoration here in the Anamalai hills, perhaps there is some hope for that, still.

Sometimes, hope, like trees, needs planting, too.

DandS_KMTR